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The impact of Arctic cloud water and ice on cloud radiative forcing during the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study in August 2008

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dc.contributor.advisor Kerry Emanuel. en_US
dc.contributor.author Maroon, Elizabeth A en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-27T14:19:58Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-27T14:19:58Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/114379
dc.description Thesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 49-52). en_US
dc.description.abstract The Arctic atmosphere is especially sensitive to changes in climate forcing; however, Arctic processes and feedbacks are not understood well enough to accurately predict how the Arctic environment might change under anthropogenic forcing. Further study of the basic atmospheric processes is needed, especially due to uncertainties in modeling cloud feedbacks. August and September are the months when the Arctic sea surfaces begin to freeze; clouds play an important role in determining when this process begins. In this study, the radiative properties of Arctic stratocumulus are studied by comparing measurements for two days in August 2008 during the Arctic Surface Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) with simulations using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM). Cloud radiative forcing for both days is examined, and the modeled radiative fluxes were found to compare well to observations. Sensitivity studies are conducted on single and multi-level stratocumulus clouds to study their radiative interactions with each other. Cloud-top cooling in upper clouds is found to radiatively turn off cloud-top cooling in clouds below it. The RRTM and the surface radiative observations are used together to constrain estimates of liquid droplet radius; constraining these radii shows the sensitivity of shortwave cloud radiative forcing and the insensitivity of long wave cloud forcing to changes in drop size. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Elizabeth A. Maroon. en_US
dc.format.extent 51 pages en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights MIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. en_US
dc.title The impact of Arctic cloud water and ice on cloud radiative forcing during the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study in August 2008 en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.B. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 1028993927 en_US


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