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dc.contributor.advisorJames L. Wescoat Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMidstokke, Paige Ken_US
dc.contributor.otherTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.coverage.spatiala-ii---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-23T16:30:34Z
dc.date.available2018-05-23T16:30:34Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/115693
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Technology and Policy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, Technology and Policy Program, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 108-119).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this project is to improve the responsiveness of District Planning to rural water scarcity in India. Through engagements with the Groundwater Survey Development Agency, and Maharashtra State Government Water Supply and Sanitation Department, we selected Aurangabad District to conduct field visits and develop a model that can spatially represent risk of villages to water scarcity. Within Aurangabad District, Vaijapur block was selected as a case study due to its drought effects and high water tanker usage in the past five years. This thesis develops a disaster risk metric for water scarcity, using an analysis of potential hazards, socioeconomic vulnerability, and policy responses to assign a "disaster risk score" to each village. Risk is seen as a function of hazard, vulnerability, and government capacity, so all three factors of risk are addressed. Villages are assigned a risk score in Vaijapur block of Aurangabad District By providing a risk score a season in advance of drought, planners are able to select an alternative capacity measures rather than the quickest tanker option. The aim of this research is to assist district governments in Maharashtra state in predicting, between one season to two years in advance, the risk of villages to drinking water scarcity in order to respond before incurring a drinking water crisis. Secondly, this model is used to prioritize infrastructure projects over the coming two years in order to best use limited financial resources to alleviate the burden of water scarcity at the village level. This research could ultimately be integrated into the existing state website for statewide planning and allocation of resources.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Paige K. Midstokke.en_US
dc.format.extent119 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectInstitute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.titleAdapting a hazards-risk model to water scarcity in rural India : Aurangabad case studyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1036985773en_US


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