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The racial politics of urban celebrations : a comparative study of Philadelphia's Mummers Parade and Odunde Festival

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dc.contributor.advisor Lawrence Vale. en_US
dc.contributor.author Whitlow, Annis, 1979- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-pa en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-06-02T18:18:59Z
dc.date.available 2005-06-02T18:18:59Z
dc.date.copyright 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/17702
dc.description Thesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2004. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description.abstract Discourses about the construction of identity, the politics of identity, and the role of design in controlling human behavior and expressing power have thus far been confined to separate realms of inquiry. This thesis will examine where these discourses intersect and how their intersection plays out in society as old conceptions of race and identity are challenged by demographic shifts and new immigrant populations. Festivals, as spatial expressions of identity that image city spaces, provide an important perspective on this topic. Philadelphia, as a former capital city that continues to struggle with race and identity in its politics, acts as a compelling backdrop for my case studies. The Mummers Parade and the Odunde Festival are two New Year's celebrations that mediate racial/political and ethnic/cultural identities for the city's white and black populations respectively. This thesis considers both festivals from their historical context and compares their current form in terms of spatial and non-spatial indicators (route, demographics, funding, and organizational structure). From this analytic framework emerges a picture of how political identities are constructed spatially, how the process of identity construction both challenges and reinforces the dominant political structure, and how the process can bridge political differences and maintain them. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Annis Whitlow. en_US
dc.format.extent 107 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 6689789 bytes
dc.format.extent 6873410 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.title The racial politics of urban celebrations : a comparative study of Philadelphia's Mummers Parade and Odunde Festival en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.C.P. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 56410273 en_US


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