Advanced Search
DSpace@MIT

Paying for transit operations : challenges and solutions for the Chicago Transit Authority

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Fred Salvucci. en_US
dc.contributor.author Kirschbaum, Julie B en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us-il en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-06-02T18:21:46Z
dc.date.available 2005-06-02T18:21:46Z
dc.date.copyright 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/17714
dc.description Thesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2004. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 141-144). en_US
dc.description.abstract This research identifies the challenges Chicagoland must confront to maintain a quality transit system. It analyzes the organizational and funding structure of the Regional Transportation Authority and its three service providers, including the Chicago Transit Authority. This investigation revealed that the greatest regional challenges are declining ridership (especially on bus) and increasing congestion from limited subsidies and a cost recovery statute. To address these challenges a series of alternatives were evaluated using a framework that considers revenue potential, incidence, side effects, and political feasibility. Based on this analysis, a four part strategy is recommended: 1. Change the current distribution formula. Unless a new allocation formula is established, CTA may not benefit from increased resources. The new formula should reduce reliance on discretionary funds by stabilizing current funding levels to the three service providers. 2. Increase RTA revenues. Currently the two wealthiest counties in the region (DuPage and Lake) pay significantly less than Cook County while enjoying comparable service. The RTA should increase their sales tax contributions to improve regional equity and increase resources. These resources should be used to address growing paratransit needs. en_US
dc.description.abstract (cont.) 3. Develop a set of performance measures that respond to distinct transit markets. Rather than focusing exclusively on the cost recovery ratio, which risks the long-term vitality of the system, the RTA should develop a set of performance measures that maximize efficiencies within markets. This will allow the region to control costs, while still protecting weaker markets like bus and paratransit. 4. Include a transit pass as part of the personal vehicle registration tax. Having people prepay for transit services will provide an incentive for replacing some automobile trips, while generating regional subsidies. In the short run, this funding mechanism will serve as an incentive for RTA to promote fare integration. If expanded over time, it offers RTA the opportunity to increase transit service. The above recommendations will help reverse the current negative trends and stabilize ridership; however to increase ridership and mode share, more subsidy will be needed. Other promising revenue generators should be considered in the future to meet these goals. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Julie B. Kirschbaum. en_US
dc.format.extent 147 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 7218941 bytes
dc.format.extent 7338934 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title Paying for transit operations : challenges and solutions for the Chicago Transit Authority en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.description.degree M.C.P. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 56429174 en_US


Files in this item

Name Size Format Description
56429174-MIT.pdf 24.96Mb PDF Full printable version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

MIT-Mirage