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Water reuse and conservation in the United States Virgin Islands

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dc.contributor.advisor Dennis McLaughlin. en_US
dc.contributor.author Cheslek, Heather A. (Heather Année), 1976- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-10-14T19:51:10Z
dc.date.available 2005-10-14T19:51:10Z
dc.date.copyright 2003 en_US
dc.date.issued 2003 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/29322
dc.description Thesis (M.Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2003. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 80-84). en_US
dc.description.abstract An assessment of the current water conservation and reuse practices in the United States Virgin Islands was undertaken by administering surveys to Territory Permit Discharge Elimination System permit holders and performing interviews. Currently, many resorts and condominiums in the US Virgin Islands (USVI) reclaim wastewater in response to water scarcity for such things as irrigation and toilet flushing, but few practice water conservation. Unfortunately, the municipal wastewater treatment plants do not practice any form of reuse. Because of the need for reuse and conservation planning in the community, eight reuse alternatives were developed for the two large municipal wastewater treatment plants on St. Thomas and St. Croix. Those reuse alternatives include: (1) residential irrigation on St. Thomas, (2) habitat restoration utilizing wetlands on St. Thomas, (3) community-wide conservation and habitat restoration on St. Thomas, (4) airport irrigation on St. Croix, (5) commercial irrigation and industrial process/cooling water on St. Croix, (6) agricultural irrigation on St. Croix, (7) habitat restoration utilizing wetlands on St. Croix, and (8) community-wide conservation and habitat restoration on St. Croix. Out of these eight alternatives, habitat restoration on both St. Thomas and St. Croix, community-wide conservation and habitat restoration on both St. Thomas and St. Croix, and agricultural irrigation on St. Croix are the most economical based on the normalized cost per gallon of reclaimed and conserved water. However, agricultural irrigation on St. Croix and community-wide conservation and habitat restoration on both St. Thomas and St. Croix provide the most benefits to the community. Agricultural irrigation provides farmers a low-cost option to meet water demand and production requirements. Community-wide conservation and habitat restoration alternatives provide an educational environment and promote conservation practices thus reducing water consumption, water cost, and wastewater production. From the assessment it is apparent that promoting conservation and reclaiming wastewater effluent results in a reduction of effluent discharged to the ocean, conservation of fresh-water sources, reduction of energy and pollution due to lower production needed by USVI Water and Power Authority (WAPA), and avoidance or delay in USVI WAPA expansion to meet non-potable water needs. Before undertaking design of a reuse project incorporation of public information and participation, public health impact identification, and local and federal government participation is crucial to project success. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Heather A. Cheslek. en_US
dc.format.extent 100 leaves en_US
dc.format.extent 5901229 bytes
dc.format.extent 5901035 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title Water reuse and conservation in the United States Virgin Islands en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.Eng. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 52717695 en_US


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