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Identifying lean practices for deriving software requirements

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dc.contributor.advisor Earll Murman. en_US
dc.contributor.author Ippolito, Brian J. (Brian James), 1970- en_US
dc.contributor.other System Design and Management Program. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-03-24T17:59:50Z
dc.date.available 2006-03-24T17:59:50Z
dc.date.copyright 2000 en_US
dc.date.issued 2000 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/29884
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, System Design & Management Program, 2000. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 133-134). en_US
dc.description.abstract Lean principles focus on employing value added activities to reduce product development cycle time, increase quality, and reduce cost. Lean originated in the automotive industry and has since been centered in the manufacturing domain. Lessons learned on implementing Lean initiatives have been captured by the in the Lean Aerospace Initiative (LAI) and incorporated into the Lean Enterprise Model (LEM) (http://lean.mit.edu/public/index.html). To the author's knowledge, this is the first research effort specifically designed to apply the Lean principles and the Lean Enterprise Model to the aerospace software requirement derivation process. Data supporting this research is the result of a comprehensive two-year research effort involving three detailed case studies with 45 case study interviews, 125 stakeholder surveys collected from ten aerospace software upgrades, feedback from numerous aerospace industry practitioners and Massachusetts Institute of technology (MIT) faculty. Ten aerospace software upgrades were analyzed at both an enterprise level and an organizational level to identify the presence of Lean practices. At the enterprise level, metrics typically used to measure enterprise performance (Flow Time, Stakeholder Satisfaction, Quality Yield, and Resource Utilization) were found to be appropriate for the software requirement process but not adequately implemented. An organizational analysis observed five of the twelve Lean practices as effectively implemented and identified opportunities to implement four more Lean practices. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Brian J. Ippolito. en_US
dc.format.extent 134 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 8206393 bytes
dc.format.extent 8224099 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject System Design and Management Program. en_US
dc.title Identifying lean practices for deriving software requirements en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department System Design and Management Program. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 45289269 en_US


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