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The air pollution implications of the residential sector : case study of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

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dc.contributor.advisor Mario J. Molina, Diane E. Davis and Stephen R. Connors. en_US
dc.contributor.author Roth, Kellyn E. (Kellyn Elizabeth), 1975- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-mx--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-03-24T18:05:54Z
dc.date.available 2006-03-24T18:05:54Z
dc.date.copyright 2003 en_US
dc.date.issued 2003 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/29951
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, Technology and Policy Program; and, Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2003. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 121-131). en_US
dc.description.abstract The residential sector has been a long-acknowledged, but seldom-addressed, source of air pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The combination of high emission levels and large numbers of people directly exposed means that the indoor environment is a unique situation. If current trends of demographic growth, urbanization and increased appliance saturation continue, the urgency to address residential sector emissions will increase considerably. Additionally, households have wide-reaching impacts on many sectors including industry through the demand for appliances, power generation and fuel suppliers through the demand for energy, services through the demand for infrastructure, and many more. Through recent efforts, researchers at MIT and in Mexico have attempted to understand and represent the residential sector, to identify and mitigate emissions release and exposure, most of which is energy-related. To reduce energy consumption, and thus emissions, in the home several strategies have been considered: reduced and improved use of fuel; increased energy efficiency; fuel leakage prevention and improved practices; improved building efficiency; and improved fuel transmission and delivery. Another issue of concern in this sector is the use of toxic solvents. Household air pollution reduction strategy outcomes are difficult to predict because of the diversity of households (e.g., size, income, location) within the residential sector. Determination of the factors that affect energy consumption and household behavior would be very useful to decision makers as they develop more targeted policies for the provision of energy services and reduction of household-generated emissions. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Kellyn E. Roth. en_US
dc.format.extent 170 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 13287942 bytes
dc.format.extent 13309398 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.subject Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.title The air pollution implications of the residential sector : case study of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 53362791 en_US


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