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What functional magnetic resonance imaging can tell us about theory of mind

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dc.contributor.advisor Nancy Kanwisher. en_US
dc.contributor.author Saxe, Rebecca R. (Rebecca Rose), 1979- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-03-24T18:14:03Z
dc.date.available 2006-03-24T18:14:03Z
dc.date.issued 2003 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/30039
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, September 2003. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description.abstract To have a theory of mind is to be able to explain and predict human behaviours and experiences in terms of mental states: beliefs, desires, goals, thoughts, and feelings. In chapters 1 and 2, I use functional magentic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural substrate of the theory of mind, in healthy human adults. I conclude (1) that specialised brain regions, including a region of the temporo-parietal junction (the TPJ-M), are selectively engaged when people reason about the contents of other people's beliefs, and (2) that the brain regions associated with belief attribution appear to be distinct from other regions engaged in the representation of goal-directed action, including a region of posterior superior temporal sulcus (the pSTS-VA). In chapters 3 and 4, I consider the implications of these and other neuroimaging results for the mental structure of theory of mind, based on proposals derived from developmental psychology and philosophy. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Rebecca R. Saxe. en_US
dc.format.extent 131 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 6727035 bytes
dc.format.extent 6726843 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Brain and Cognitive Sciences. en_US
dc.title What functional magnetic resonance imaging can tell us about theory of mind en_US
dc.title.alternative What fMRI can tell us about theory of mind en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 55089423 en_US


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