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Feature-based design of solids with local composition control

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dc.contributor.advisor Nicholas M. Patrikalakis and Emanuel M. Sachs. en_US
dc.contributor.author Liu, Hongye, 1970- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Ocean Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-07-13T15:25:19Z
dc.date.available 2006-07-13T15:25:19Z
dc.date.copyright 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/33449
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Ocean Engineering, 2004. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 126-134). en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis presents a parametric and feature-based methodology for the design of solids with local composition control (LCC). A suite of composition design features are conceptualized and implemented. The designer can use them singly or in combination, to specify the composition of complex components. Each material composition design feature relates directly to the geometry of the design, often relying on user interaction to specify critical aspects of the geometry. This approach allows the designer to simultaneously edit geometry and composition by varying parameters until a satisfactory result is attained. The identified LCC features are those based on volume, transition, pattern, and (user-defined) surface features. The material composition functions include functions parametrized with respect to distance or distances to user-defined geometric features; and functions that use Laplace's equation to blend smoothly various boundary conditions including values and gradients of the material composition on the boundaries. The Euclidean digital distance transform and the boundary element method are adapted to the efficient computation of composition functions. Theoretical and experimental complexity, accuracy and convergence analyses are presented. The developed model is a multi-level and graph-based representation, thereby allowing for controls on the model validity and efficiency in model management. The representations underlying the composition design features are analytic in nature and therefore concise. Evaluation for visualization and fabrication is performed only at the resolutions required for these purposes, thereby reducing the computational burden. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Hongye Liu. en_US
dc.format.extent 134 leaves en_US
dc.format.extent 6597267 bytes
dc.format.extent 6602913 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Ocean Engineering. en_US
dc.title Feature-based design of solids with local composition control en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Ocean Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 62890577 en_US


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