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Impression formation in the information age : a study and design for online dating

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dc.contributor.advisor Dan Ariely. en_US
dc.contributor.author Frost, Jeana (Jeana H.), 1973- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program In Media Arts and Sciences en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-02-12T16:48:58Z
dc.date.available 2008-02-12T16:48:58Z
dc.date.copyright 2005 en_US
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/33879 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/33879
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2005. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-113). en_US
dc.description.abstract 43% of American adults are single and many are looking for new social and romantic connections. At the same time, the Internet offers services to both research and contact other individuals. As a result, proactive computer savvy singles are logging on to find romantic partners. While the online dating industry advertises its success citing the large number of registered users, other evidence indicates broad dissatisfaction: the analysis of website behavior reveals that most users are inactive and experienced online daters state a preference for dating offline versus on. To account for this dissatisfaction, I locate decision-point failures. To improve the process, I propose and test an alternate model. Part 1 shows that acquiring more information - one of the perceived benefits of meeting online and reading profiles - can have negative effects, such as leading to less liking over time, while failing to make people really believe they know others better. The expectation that getting to know others more will lead to more liking, coupled with the fact that more information leads to less liking, means that online daters are frequently disappointed, causing them to leave dating sites, and to continue to prefer offline dating despite its drawbacks. en_US
dc.description.abstract (cont.) Part 2 focuses on interventions to improve the online dating experience, making it more similar to life offline through the introduction of "virtual dates" where people "pre-meet" online before they meet face-to-face. In particular, these interventions are targeted at mitigating the overly positive expectations online daters who only read profiles have, bringing expectations for dates more in line with reality, leading to less disappointment- and possibly increased likelihood of finding a match. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Jena H. Frost. en_US
dc.format.extent 113 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/33879 en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Architecture. Program In Media Arts and Sciences en_US
dc.title Impression formation in the information age : a study and design for online dating en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program In Media Arts and Sciences en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 66464841 en_US


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