Advanced Search
DSpace@MIT

Citizenship, exclusion, and political organizations : political response to immigrant policy

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Suzanne Berger. en_US
dc.contributor.author Jeffrey, David P., 1962- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Political Science. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-11-06T16:12:34Z
dc.date.available 2006-11-06T16:12:34Z
dc.date.copyright 2000 en_US
dc.date.issued 2000 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/34339
dc.description Thesis (Ph.D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Political Science, 2000. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 304-325). en_US
dc.description.abstract The dissertation examines whether policy can foster the political incorporation and democratic participation of immigrants. The study compares immigrants' political responses to immigrant policy in Sweden and Germany. Sweden is the critical case because Sweden's immigrant policy attempts to shorten the intergenerational integration of immigrants into the host society. The Swedish government extended the benefits of its universalistic welfare state to non citizens, "topped off' benefits through direct measures specifically for immigrants, and extended voting and office holding rights to non-citizens. The study examines three main questions. Does extending the welfare state and the political franchise to immigrants alter the general immigrant experience of intergenerational integration into the host society? Is Sweden's extension and support for immigrant political rights successful in promoting immigrant political participation? Is Sweden's immigrant policy successful in defining the forms of immigrant political participation, configuring immigrant associational patterns, and influencing immigrant political goals? Sweden's extension of its universalistic welfare state does not seem to alter immigrants' intergenerational integration into the host society. There is little difference in the economic and social situations of immigrants in Sweden and Germany, a country which makes a less comprehensive attempt to integrate immigrants into its society. Sweden's extension and support for immigrants' political rights are partially successful in promoting immigrant political participation. Sweden's immigrant policy is successful in defining the forms of immigrant political participation, configuring immigrant associational patterns, and influencing how immigrants achieve their political goals. The study suggests that civic tradition and associational life are factors that need not translate into greater political participation. Still, government policies can strongly influence how immigrants perceive and participate in politics. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by David P. Jeffrey. en_US
dc.format.extent 325 leaves en_US
dc.format.extent 21185643 bytes
dc.format.extent 21200419 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Political Science. en_US
dc.title Citizenship, exclusion, and political organizations : political response to immigrant policy en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Political Science. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 45321535 en_US


Files in this item

Name Size Format Description
45321535-MIT.pdf 20.21Mb PDF Full printable version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

MIT-Mirage