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"One world, one life" : the politics of personal connection in Virginia Woolf's The waves

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dc.contributor.advisor Diana Henderson, Ruth Perry and Shankar Raman. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rodal, Jocelyn (Jocelyn Aurora Frampton) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Humanities. en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Literature Section. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-01-10T21:02:10Z
dc.date.available 2007-01-10T21:02:10Z
dc.date.copyright 2006 en_US
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/35703
dc.description Thesis (S.B. in Literature)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Humanities, 2006. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 68-70). en_US
dc.description.abstract Introduction: "I hear a sound," said Rhoda, "cheep, chirp; cheep, chirp; going up and down" (9). Thus Virginia Woolf introduces Rhoda in her opening to The Waves. But almost immediately, this sound is transformed: " 'The birds sang in chorus first,' said Rhoda. 'Now the scullery door is unbarred. Off they fly. Off they fly like a fling of seed. But one sings by the bedroom window alone' " (10-11). While the birds were originally a unified, collective sound, "going up and down" as one, now they fly away as many, spreading like seeds that will eventually grow individually to create separate new lives. Rhoda implies that they sang as one only because they had no other choice - the door was barred, and they were jailed together. However, the single bird remaining by the window deep in song is a noteworthy figure. Like Rhoda, and human consciousness itself, it might be lonely or free, proudly individual or vulnerable in its solitude. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Jocelyn Rodal. en_US
dc.format.extent 70 leaves en_US
dc.format.extent 4067050 bytes
dc.format.extent 4069754 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Humanities. en_US
dc.subject Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Literature Section. e
dc.subject.lcsh Woolf, Virginia, 1882-1941. Waves. en_US
dc.title "One world, one life" : the politics of personal connection in Virginia Woolf's The waves en_US
dc.title.alternative Politics of personal connection in Virginia Woolf's The waves en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.B.in Literature en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Literature Section. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 71248827 en_US


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