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Boundary element modeling of elasticity in materials in terms of distribution of second phase structures

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dc.contributor.advisor Adam C. Powell, IV. en_US
dc.contributor.author Lok, Yi Cheung en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-02-21T13:07:14Z
dc.date.available 2007-02-21T13:07:14Z
dc.date.copyright 2006 en_US
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/36212
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2006. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 112-113). en_US
dc.description.abstract The Boundary Element Method is used to study the interaction of second phase objects in a material. In particular, this study examines the relationship between stress parameters, such as stress concentration and normal traction, and geometrical parameters such as separation distance and orientation. The use of BEM enables easy manipulation of internal objects and rapid re-calculation in a series of simulations. Additional library functions are added to Julian, a general BEM solver, to expand its functionality to include elasticity calculation, inclusion modeling, and shape optimization with parallel processing. With a few thousand nodes, it is found that computation time scales as O(V), where N is the resolution of the mesh in each direction. An accuracy of over 99% is achieved in many benchmarks. A spherical cavity next to an inclusion is found to have higher stress concentration when aligned parallel to the loading direction. Stress analysis on a pair of neighboring cavities shows relatively small (less than 10%) increase in stress concentration beyond a separation of 0.5 diameter. en_US
dc.description.abstract (cont.) While highest stress is observed when two cavities are aligned perpendicular to loading direction at very close separation, the highest stress configuration deviates from that alignment to almost +/- 30 degrees as separation increases. The radius of interaction is found to be determined by the larger of two second phase objects and is larger for a cavity surrounded by eight cavities in three dimensions. Our result suggests that a 15% weight saving is possible in a closed-cell foam for less than 10% increase in stress concentration due to the presence of immediate neighbors. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Yi Cheung Lok. en_US
dc.format.extent 113 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.title Boundary element modeling of elasticity in materials in terms of distribution of second phase structures en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 76906378 en_US


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