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Trucking country : food politics and the transformation of rural life in Postwar America

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dc.contributor.advisor Deborah K. Fitzgerald. en_US
dc.contributor.author Hamilton, Shane, 1976- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-10-19T20:27:06Z
dc.date.available 2007-10-19T20:27:06Z
dc.date.copyright 2005 en_US
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39178
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology (HASTS))--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Science, Technology and Society, 2005. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (v. 2, p. 395-423). en_US
dc.description.abstract Trucking replaced railroads as the primary link between rural producers and urban consumers in the mid-twentieth century. With this technological change came a fundamental transformation of the defining features of rural life after World War II. Trucking helped drive the shift from a New Deal-era political economy-based on centralized political authority, a highly regulated farm and food economy, and collective social values-to a postwar framework of anti-statism, minimal market regulation, and fierce individualism. Trucking and rural truck drivers were at the heart of what I call the "marketing machine," a new kind of food economy that arose after World War II, characterized by decentralized food processors and supermarkets seeking high volume, low prices, and consistent quality to eliminate uncertainties from the food distribution chain. This marketing machine developed as a reaction against the statist food and farm policies of the New Deal. Government agricultural experts-economists, engineers, and policymakers-encouraged the growth of highway transportation in an effort to redefine the "farm problem" as an industrial problem, an issue to be solved by rural food processors and non-unionized "independent" truck drivers rather than price supports or acreage controls. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Shane L. Hamilton. en_US
dc.format.extent 2 v. (423 p.) en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Program in Science, Technology and Society. en_US
dc.title Trucking country : food politics and the transformation of rural life in Postwar America en_US
dc.title.alternative Food politics and the transformation of rural life in Postwar America en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D.in History and Social Study of Science and Technology (HASTS en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 62716029 en_US


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