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Analysis of system wide distortion in an integrated power system utilizing a high voltage DC bus and silicon carbide power devices

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dc.contributor.advisor James L. Kirtley. en_US
dc.contributor.author Fallier, William F. (William Frederick) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-12-07T16:14:45Z
dc.date.available 2007-12-07T16:14:45Z
dc.date.copyright 2007 en_US
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39730
dc.description Thesis (Nav. E.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2007. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 81-82). en_US
dc.description.abstract This research investigates the distortion on the electrical distribution system for a high voltage DC Integrated Power System (IPS). The analysis was concentrated on the power supplied to a propulsion motor driven by an inverter with simulated silicon carbide switches. Theoretically, silicon carbide switches have the advantage of being able to withstand a very large blocking voltage and carry very large forward currents. Silicon carbide switches are also very efficient due to their quick rise and fall times. Since silicon carbide switches can withstand high voltage differentials and switch faster than silicon switches, the switching effects on the electrical distribution system were investigated. The current state of silicon carbide power electronics was also investigated. This research quantifies the current and voltage distortion over various operating conditions. A system model was developed using Matlab, Simulink, and SimPowerSystems. The model consisted of a synchronous generator supplying a rectifier and inverter set driving an induction motor. This induction motor simulates the propulsion motor for a Navy ship. This model had a DC link voltage of 10 kV in order to simulate future Navy IPS systems. The current and voltage distortion were compared to MIL STD 1399 and IEEE STD 519 and 45. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by William F. Fallier. en_US
dc.format.extent 172 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.title Analysis of system wide distortion in an integrated power system utilizing a high voltage DC bus and silicon carbide power devices en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.description.degree Nav.E. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 181006289 en_US


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