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Electromagnetic Scattering by Open-Ended Cavities: An Analysis Using Precorrected-FFT Approach

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dc.contributor.author Nie, Xiaochun
dc.contributor.author Li, Le-Wei
dc.date.accessioned 2003-12-23T02:23:28Z
dc.date.available 2003-12-23T02:23:28Z
dc.date.issued 2002-01
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/4001
dc.description.abstract In this paper, the precorrected-FFT method is used to solve the electromagnetic scattering from two-dimensional cavities of arbitrary shape. The integral equation is discretized by the method of moments and the resultant matrix equation is solved iteratively by the generalized conjugate residual method. Instead of directly computing the matrix-vector multiplication, which requires N² operations, this approach reduces the computation complexity to O(N log N) as well as avoids the storage of large matrices. At the same time, a technique known as the complexifying k is applied to accelerate the convergence of the iterative method in solving this resonance problem. Some examples are considered and excellent agreements of radar cross sections between these computed using the present method and those from the direct solution are observed, demonstrating the feasibility and efficiency of the present method. en
dc.description.sponsorship Singapore-MIT Alliance (SMA) en
dc.format.extent 160248 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries High Performance Computation for Engineered Systems (HPCES);
dc.subject precorrected-FFT method en
dc.subject method-of-moments en
dc.subject electrical-field integral equation en
dc.subject electromagnetic scattering en
dc.subject cavity en
dc.title Electromagnetic Scattering by Open-Ended Cavities: An Analysis Using Precorrected-FFT Approach en
dc.type Article en


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