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Eavesdroppers : how scientists are learning to listen in on the animal kingdom : four stories on wildlife and sound

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dc.contributor.advisor Boyce Rensberger. en_US
dc.contributor.author Quill, Elizabeth H. (Elizabeth Helene) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-03T14:43:55Z
dc.date.available 2008-09-03T14:43:55Z
dc.date.copyright 2007 en_US
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/42149
dc.description Thesis (S.M. in Science Writing)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Humanities, Graduate Program in Science Writing, 2007. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 43-44). en_US
dc.description.abstract Typically, if scientists want to study animals in the wild they rely on field observations by eye. If they want to track those species to know where they are, where they are going, and how they behave, then researchers may capture and tag them. These methods, however, are difficult if not impossible for rare and hard-to-see species like whales in the ocean, elephants under a forest canopy, or birds at night. Sound gives scientists a new way of knowing what is swimming, roaming, and flying where. And some scientists are using these sounds for conservation, to identify the habitats animals need to survive and to protect the animals from human activity. Of course, as with any new science, there are unanswered questions. The uncertainties are especially profound in the ocean, where researchers know little about how marine creatures hear. Scientists are still searching for answers, but now they have a new way to find them. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Elizabeth H. Quill. en_US
dc.format.extent 44 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.title Eavesdroppers : how scientists are learning to listen in on the animal kingdom : four stories on wildlife and sound en_US
dc.title.alternative Four stories on wildlife and sound en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M.in Science Writing en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 228415448 en_US


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