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Judicious imitation : children differentially imitate deterministically and probabilistically effective actions

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dc.contributor.advisor Lara Schulz. en_US
dc.contributor.author Hooppell, Catherine Amanda Jane en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-03T15:00:05Z
dc.date.available 2008-09-03T15:00:05Z
dc.date.copyright 2007 en_US
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/42226
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 2007. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 43-46). en_US
dc.description.abstract Three studies look at whether the assumption of causal determinism (the assumption that all else being equal, causes generate effects deterministically) affects children's imitation of modeled actions. We show that, even when the frequency of an effect is matched, both preschoolers and toddlers imitate actions more faithfully when modeled actions are deterministically rather than probabilistically effective. A third study suggests that preschoolers' imitation is affected, not just by whether the agent's goal is satisfied but also by whether the action is a reliable means to the goal. Children's tendency to generate variable responses to probabilistically effective modeled actions could support causal learning. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Catherine Amanda Jane Hooppell. en_US
dc.format.extent 49 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Brain and Cognitive Sciences. en_US
dc.title Judicious imitation : children differentially imitate deterministically and probabilistically effective actions en_US
dc.title.alternative Differential imitation en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 230959668 en_US


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