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Laboratory evaluation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a new in situ chemical sensing technique for the deep ocean

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dc.contributor.advisor Alan D. Chave and Alexandra H. Techet. en_US
dc.contributor.author Michel, Anna Pauline Miranda, 1976- en_US
dc.contributor.other Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-09-03T15:15:41Z
dc.date.available 2008-09-03T15:15:41Z
dc.date.copyright 2007 en_US
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/42296
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), 2007. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description.abstract Present-day expeditionary oceanography is beginning to shift from a focus on short-term ship and submersible deployments to an ocean observatory mode where long-term temporally-focused studies are feasible. As a result, a critical need for in situ chemical sensors is evolving. New sensors take a significant amount of time to develop; thus, the evaluation of techniques in the laboratory for use in the ocean environment is becoming increasingly important. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) possesses many of the characteristics required for such in situ chemical sensing, and is a promising technique for field measurements in extreme environments. Although many LIBS researchers have focused their work on liquid jets or surfaces, little attention has been paid to bulk liquid analysis, and especially to the effect of oceanic pressures on LIBS signals. In this work, laboratory experiments validate the LIBS technique in a simulated deep ocean environment to pressures up to 2.76 x 10⁷ Pa. A key focus of this work is the validation that select elements important for understanding hydrothermal vent fluid chemistry (Na, Ca, Mn, Mg, K, and Li) are detectable using LIBS. A data processing scheme that accurately deals with the extreme nature of laser-induced plasma formation was developed that allows for statistically accurate comparisons of spectra. The use of both single and double pulse LIBS for high pressure bulk aqueous solutions is explored and the system parameters needed for the detection of the key analytes are optimized. Using both single and double pulse LIBS, the limits of detection were found to be higher than expected as a result of the spectrometer used in this experimentation. However, the results of this validation show that LIBS possesses the characteristics to be a viable chemical sensing method for in situ analyte detection in high pressure environments like the deep ocean. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Anna Pauline Miranda Michel. en_US
dc.format.extent 173 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject /Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Atomic emission spectroscopy en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Chemical oceanography Instruments en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Hydrothermal vents Research en_US
dc.title Laboratory evaluation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a new in situ chemical sensing technique for the deep ocean en_US
dc.title.alternative Laboratory evaluation of LIBS as a new in situ chemical sensing technique for the deep ocean en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Joint Program in Oceanography/Applied Ocean Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 232358648 en_US


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