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Testimonials versus informational persuasive messages : the moderating effect of delivery mode and personal involvement

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dc.contributor.advisor Quing [i.e. Qing] Zeng. en_US
dc.contributor.author Braverman, Julia en_US
dc.contributor.other Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-12-11T18:43:55Z
dc.date.available 2008-12-11T18:43:55Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/43877
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 2008. en_US
dc.description "June 2008." en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 40-47). en_US
dc.description.abstract Health communications use factual information or/and personal testimonials to inform and influence individual decisions that enhance health. Increasingly, Web and other computer-based systems are being used to communicate with patients. This study aims to test the relative effectiveness of testimonials compared to simple informational health messages presented through different modalities, and to the recipients with different levels of involvement. Results of the three independent experiments demonstrate that testimonials are more persuasive when presented through the audio mode rather than when presented through the written mode. Also, the informational messages are more persuasive when perceived by individuals characterized by high rather than low involvement and high rather than low need-for-cognition. The results are explained in terms of the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM). The interactive effect of transportation (Green & Brock, 2004) and involvement on persuasion is further examined. The findings help in developing the more effective ways of computer-based health communication. The highest level of efficiency can be achieved if the appropriate media modality and message format are used for recipients with certain initial involvement or need-for-cognition. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Julia Braverman. en_US
dc.format.extent 57 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.title Testimonials versus informational persuasive messages : the moderating effect of delivery mode and personal involvement en_US
dc.title.alternative Testimonial versus informational messages en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 263431371 en_US


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