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Nondestructive evaluation and underwater repair of composite structures

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dc.contributor.advisor James H. Williams, Jr. and Patrick J. Keenan. en_US
dc.contributor.author Hagan, William L. (William Laurie), III en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-03-16T19:55:37Z
dc.date.available 2009-03-16T19:55:37Z
dc.date.copyright 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/44884
dc.description Thesis (S.M. and Nav. E.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2008. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 98-106). en_US
dc.description.abstract Composite materials are gaining popularity in U.S. Naval applications because of their unparalleled strength, stiffness, and manufacturing simplicity. A better understanding of the structural integrity of these materials has the potential to reduce overdesign, decrease manufacturing cost, and simplify repairs. Though underwater nondestructive evaluation of composites has not been well documented, this thesis illustrates the available technologies for underwater evaluation and repair of laminated composite structures, similar to those currently used in marine applications. Dependent on accuracy and reliability of underwater evaluation, the decision to pursue temporary or permanent repairs may be made based on available information regarding the structural integrity of the effected repairs. Discussion of the environmental effects on composite laminates and their repairs is included to provide insight into the detrimental effects of contaminates such as saltwater and petroleum products. The effect of the environment has a profound impact on the quality of composite repairs using currently available repair materials. Underwater repairs, whether permanent or temporary, are suggested for future U.S. Navy components such as the DDG-1000 composite twisted rudder. Furthermore, a suggestion is made to eliminate the use of cofferdams on U.S. Navy shaft covering repairs in order to reduce both cost and the risk of injury associated with a cofferdam. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by William L. Hagan III. en_US
dc.format.extent 107 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.title Nondestructive evaluation and underwater repair of composite structures en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M.and Nav.E. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 302392021 en_US


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