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Maintaining rainwater harvesting practices in southern Lebanon : the kaza of Tyre

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dc.contributor.advisor James Wescoat and Peter Shanahan. en_US
dc.contributor.author Hayek, Carolyn, M. C. P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial a-le--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-11-06T16:22:19Z
dc.date.available 2009-11-06T16:22:19Z
dc.date.copyright 2009 en_US
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/49702
dc.description Thesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning; and, (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2009. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 49-51). en_US
dc.description.abstract Despite relatively extensive surface water and groundwater networks, along with abundant rainfall, Lebanon is facing water scarcity due to factors such as pollution of freshwater resources, climate change, population growth, and increased demand. Limited surface water resources in southern Lebanon have fostered a cultural tradition of rainwater harvesting in the area. Rain is collected on both the household and the community level through rooftop and runoff collection systems (i.e. birkis), respectively. Rainwater harvesting has the potential to play a major role in achieving water security in Lebanon by acting as an emergency water supply. However, several of the towns in the area have decreased their dependence on privately collected rainwater and have further been considering whether to maintain birkis. A comparative analysis of two specific towns in the kaza of Tyre is used to better understand what drives the local decision to maintain rainwater-harvesting practices. Calculations show that the estimated water supply from rainwater harvesting could be used to meet the basic water needs of the respective populations in an extended dry season. In addition, five factors are identified as possible driving forces in the birki maintenance decision: land scarcity, cultural shift (i.e. a divergence from traditional practices), public health and safety, water needs, and organizational capacity. This research can be helpful in amending the design of birkis to address these drivers while preserving the water-storing capacity of the birki. Opportunities for further study are also identified. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Carolyn Hayek. en_US
dc.format.extent 54 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title Maintaining rainwater harvesting practices in southern Lebanon : the kaza of Tyre en_US
dc.title.alternative Kaza of Tyre en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.Eng. en_US
dc.description.degree M.C.P. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 436283216 en_US


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