Advanced Search
DSpace@MIT

All fired-up about coal : technology & policy recommendations for the 2030 United Kingdom energy strategy

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor David H. Marks and Stephen Connors. en_US
dc.contributor.author Donnelly, Kathy A. (Kathy Ann) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial e-uk--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-07T21:00:40Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-07T21:00:40Z
dc.date.copyright 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/50610
dc.description Thesis (S.M. in Technology and Policy)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, Technology and Policy Program; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2008. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 67-69). en_US
dc.description.abstract Given United Kingdom (UK) carbon dioxide emissions policies that direct attention at the electricity segment, the focus is on the largest electricity polluter, coal, and the immediately pressing issue of UK coal policy. There is also some consideration of overall energy systems impacts. Coal is an abundant, yet environmentally damaging fossil fuel at every stage of use. In the European Union (EU), regulation will require Flue Gas Desulphurization (FGD) technology on all existing coal plants by 2016, which represents a large capital expenditure. In addition, the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme will likely require future carbon abatement technologies on coal plants. In fact, several proposed UK coal generators are currently considering uncertain technology solutions to carbon emissions, Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). For these reasons, the future price of coal generation remains largely uncertain with a wide confidence band. This thesis uses real options analysis to develop low, medium, and high coal and carbon prices in the year 2030 to account for future uncertainties. These scenarios are compared against current and proposed coal and carbon policies to determine investment scenario paths, which will allow for investment decision modifications as price and policy factors change. The major conclusion of the analysis is that when accounting for high carbon and fuel price uncertainties, it is cheaper to build a new supercritical plant than it is to retrofit an existing plant. This is especially true for older plants and if the FGD and CCS technologies will be implemented in stages. Therefore, it is a finding of this thesis that the UK should set stringent coal policy, and support that policy with stringent emissions regulations and planning processes, to send strong price signals immediately to invest today either in new clean coal infrastructure or, preferably, in other sustainable technologies rather than face a costly further delay of energy system investments. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Kathy A. Donnelly. en_US
dc.format.extent 85 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.subject Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title All fired-up about coal : technology & policy recommendations for the 2030 United Kingdom energy strategy en_US
dc.title.alternative Technology & policy recommendations for the 2030 United Kingdom energy strategy en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.description.degree S.M.in Technology and Policy en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 468832561 en_US


Files in this item

Name Size Format Description
468832561.pdf 11.74Mb PDF Preview, non-printable (open to all)
468832561-MIT.pdf 11.74Mb PDF Full printable version (MIT only)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

MIT-Mirage