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Unintended effects of federal transportation policy: a look at the lifecycle costs of the interstate system

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dc.contributor.advisor Frederick P. Salvucci. en_US
dc.contributor.author Lukmann, Andrew T en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-25T20:55:18Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-25T20:55:18Z
dc.date.copyright 2009 en_US
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/55157
dc.description Thesis (S.M. in Transportation)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; and, (S.M. in Technology and Policy)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, Technology and Policy Program, 2009. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description.abstract The federal surface transportation program in the United States stands at a crossroads. Short on money and lacking vision, the program is in need of reevaluation and reform. This thesis attempts to illustrate the current issues affecting the program within the historical context of transportation system development and proposes a series of policy reforms to refocus the program. An analysis of the history of US transportation policy demonstrates ongoing persistent trends towards multimodal approaches, increased federal involvement and a shift in focus from rural development to enabling the growth of metropolitan economies. The analysis also shows how Congress has historically made significant progress when an over-arching vision can be connected to implementation mechanisms that provide new funding to broad constituencies in all fifty states. By positing a basic model utilizing infrastructure lifecycle costs to illustrate the dynamics of systematic infrastructure needs, the research demonstrates the added costs of past policies - particularly deferred maintenance - and the implications of current inaction. The research finds an estimated $7.2 billion dollar shortfall in annual funding on the Interstate system alone - mostly for reconstruction. Additionally, the results indicate a significant increase in annual system costs ($28.3 billion vs. $18.82 billion) under a regime of deferred maintenance as opposed to regular upkeep. Using this as a foundation, the balance of the work discusses the political argument in support of a federal role in system maintenance, recommends a series of policy reforms to address short and long term issues with the federal program and presents an overview of possible revenue streams to fund these changes. The thesis then recommends that a new national multimodal vision, focused on state of good repair and the opportunity to generate short-term construction jobs and long-term economic growth, can be the basis for successful reauthorization legislation. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Andrew T. Lukmann. en_US
dc.format.extent 110 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.subject Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.title Unintended effects of federal transportation policy: a look at the lifecycle costs of the interstate system en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M.in Technology and Policy en_US
dc.description.degree S.M.in Transportation en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 607553633 en_US


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