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Presidents, Their Styles and Their Leadership

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dc.contributor.author Greenstein, Fred I.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-06-17T19:30:57Z
dc.date.available 2010-06-17T19:30:57Z
dc.date.issued 2005-01-11
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/55942
dc.description.abstract If one set out to design a democracy in which the personal qualities of the top leader could be expected to have an impact on political outcomes, the result might well resemble the political system of the United States. The separation of powers and the Constitutional provision for a president with autonomous powers such as the veto have enabled chief executives to place a personal stamp on the nation's policies since the founding of the Republic; but until the1930s, Congress typically took the lead in policy making, and the activities of the federal government had little impact on the nation and world. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Center for Public Leadership en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Center for Public Leadership Working Paper Series;05-11
dc.rights Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/ en
dc.subject hks en_US
dc.subject cpl en_US
dc.subject kennedy school en_US
dc.subject leadership en_US
dc.subject president en_US
dc.subject politics en_US
dc.title Presidents, Their Styles and Their Leadership en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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