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Nervebox : a control system for machines that make music

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dc.contributor.advisor Tod Machover. en_US
dc.contributor.author Cavatorta, Andrew Albert en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-31T14:52:21Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-31T14:52:21Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/57805
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 81-83). en_US
dc.description.abstract The last 130 years of musical invention are punctuated with fascinating musical instruments that use the electromechanical actuation to turn various natural phenomena into sound and music. But this history is very sparse compared to analog and PC-based digital synthesis. The development of these electromechanical musical instruments presents a daunting array of technical challenges. Musical pioneers wishing to develop new electromechanical instruments often spend most of their finite time and resources solving the same set of problems over and over. This difficulty inhibits the development of new electromechanical instruments and often detracts from the quality of those that are completed. As a solution to this problem, I propose Nervebox - a platform of code and basic hardware that encapsulates generalized solutions to problems encountered repeatedly during the development of electromechanical instruments. Upon its official release, I hope for Nervebox to help start a small revolution in electromechanical music, much like MAX/MSP and others have done for PC-based synthesis, and like the abstraction of basic concepts like oscillators and filters has done for analog electronic synthesis. Anyone building new electromechanical instruments can start with much of their low-level work already done. This will enable them to focus more on composition and the instruments' various aesthetic dimensions. The system is written in Python, JavaScript and Verilog. It is free, generalized, and easily extensible. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Andrew Albert Cavatorta. en_US
dc.format.extent 83 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.title Nervebox : a control system for machines that make music en_US
dc.title.alternative Nervebox : the first general platform for electromechanical musical instruments en_US
dc.title.alternative Control system for machines that make music en_US
dc.title.alternative First general platform for electromechanical musical instruments en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 656274057 en_US


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