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Open government information awareness

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dc.contributor.advisor Chris P. Csikszentmihályi. en_US
dc.contributor.author McKinley, Ryan, 1976- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program In Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-04-04T16:15:21Z
dc.date.available 2011-04-04T16:15:21Z
dc.date.copyright 2003 en_US
dc.date.issued 2003 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62042
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2003. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 98-100). en_US
dc.description.abstract In the United States, there is a widening gap between a citizen's ability to monitor his or her government and the government's ability to monitor a citizen. Average citizens have limited access to important government records, while available information is often illegible. Meanwhile, the government's eagerness and means to oversee a citizen's personal activity is rapidly increasing. As the government broadens internal surveillance, and collaborates with private institutions to access data on the public, it is crucial that we maintain a symmetry of accountability. If we believe the United States should be a government "of the people, by the people, and for the people" it is of central importance to provide citizens with the power to oversee their government. At least as much effort should be spent building tools to facilitate citizens supervising their government as tools to help the government monitor individuals. In this thesis, I discuss the motivations, design, and implementation of Government Information Awareness, a citizen run database on our government. Fundamentally, this system relies on an organizational structure that accepts information from an anonymous population, stores it, and represents it with enough context to maintain legibility. My work in this thesis is offering a framework for a system that could help citizens pool their collective knowledge, and through this process, create a more informed public capable of self-rule. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility Ryan McKinley. en_US
dc.format.extent 139 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Architecture. Program In Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.title Open government information awareness en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program In Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 54882289 en_US


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