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Design and evaluation of a device for trapping hepatitis C viral particles at ultra low concentrations

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dc.contributor.advisor Michael J. Cima. en_US
dc.contributor.author Ekchian, Gregory J en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-09T15:18:05Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-09T15:18:05Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62675
dc.description Thesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 55-58). en_US
dc.description.abstract A new method to quantify hepatitis C (HCV) viral particles when present in ultra low concentrations is being developed. Hepatitis C is a viral infection that affects the liver. There are 3.2 million people in the United States with an active hepatitis C infection. Untreated HCV can lead to cirrhosis, liver failure and liver cancer. HCV treatments can be very costly and physically taxing for patients; the side-effects of treatment are comparable to persistent flu-like symptoms. Physicians are looking to shorten the duration of the standard treatment, typically 24 to 48 weeks, for patients who respond quickly. Physicians must have more sensitive testing equipment to truly know when a patient has been cured and be able to successfully shorten the length of treatment. Current diagnostic tests are insufficiently sensitive when the patient begins to positively respond to treatment and the amount of the virus present in his/her blood dramatically decreases. This limitation can be overcome by employing an in-vivo sampling technique, where a device is placed in a vein to trap HCV viral particles present in the blood. These particles are then subsequently quantified with a commercially available test. This technique allows at least 40,000 times more blood to be sampled in 30 minutes than with a traditional blood draw, greatly increasing the effective sensitivity of the test. The approach provides significant medical benefit to the patient being treated and a strong financial incentive to the entity paying for the treatment. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Gregory J. Ekchian. en_US
dc.format.extent 58 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.title Design and evaluation of a device for trapping hepatitis C viral particles at ultra low concentrations en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.Eng. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 714257917 en_US


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