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Effect of chemically induced mGluR-dependent long-term depression on dendritic spine volume

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dc.contributor.advisor Susumu Tonegawa. en_US
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Alexander J. (Alexander James) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-09T15:21:59Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-09T15:21:59Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/62699
dc.description Thesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 2010. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 34-36). en_US
dc.description.abstract Based on extracellular field recordings and stimulations at the Schaeffer collateral-CA1 synapse, the synaptic tagging and capture (STC) model has hypothesized that at synapses that express any form of LTP and LTD (long-term potentiation and depression, respectively) are tagged in a protein synthesis-independent manner, the induction of LLTP/ L-LTD leads to protein synthesis, and all tagged synapses can use the resulting plasticity-related products to express L-LTP/L-LTD. Several models have hypothesized that STC works through somatically synthesized plasticity-related protein products available to synapses throughout the neuron, suggesting that, at the single neuronal level, memory engrams are formed at synapses throughout the dendritic arbor. However, the Clustered Plasticity Hypothesis suggests that neurons store long-term memory engrams at synapses that tend to be spatially clustered within dendritic branches, as opposed to dispersed throughout the dendritic arbor. This hypothesis suggests that the dendritic branch, as opposed to the synapse, is the primary unit for long-term memory storage. Evidence for this hypothesis has come from studies of LTP, however, and there is no such data for LTD. This thesis establishes a single-synapse marker for LTD, namely spine length changes, that can be used to study the role of LTD and dendritic branch-specific plasticity. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Alexander J. Murphy. en_US
dc.format.extent 36 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Nuclear Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.title Effect of chemically induced mGluR-dependent long-term depression on dendritic spine volume en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.B. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 714584858 en_US


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