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Spatial Orientation and Distribution of Reservoir Fractures from Scattered Seismic Energy

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dc.contributor.author Vetri, Laura
dc.contributor.author Willis, Mark E.
dc.contributor.author Burns, Daniel R.
dc.contributor.author Rao, Rama V. N.
dc.contributor.author Minsley, Burke J.
dc.contributor.author Toksoz, M. Nafi
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Earth Resources Laboratory en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-06T17:36:24Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-06T17:36:24Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/68015
dc.description Shortened title: Fracture characterization from coda energy en_US
dc.description.abstract We present the details of a new method for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method is based upon observations we have made from 3D finite difference modeling of the reflected and scattered seismic energy over discrete systems of vertical fractures. Regularly spaced, discrete vertical fracture corridors impart a coda signature, which is a ringing tail of scattered energy, to any seismic waves which are transmitted through or reflected off of them. This signature varies in amplitude and coherence as a function of several parameters including: 1) the difference in angle between the orientation of the fractures and the acquisition direction, 2) the fracture spacing, 3) the wavelength of the illuminating seismic energy, and 4) the compliance, or stiffness, of the fractures. This coda energy is the most coherent when the acquisition direction is parallel to the strike of the fractures. It has the largest amplitude when the seismic wavelengths are tuned to the fracture spacing, and when the fractures have low stiffness. Our method uses surface seismic reflection traces to derive a transfer function which quantifies the change in an apparent source wavelet before and after propagating through a fractured interval. The transfer function for an interval with no or low amounts of scattering will be more spike-like and temporally compact. The transfer function for an interval with high scattering will ring and be less temporally compact. When a 3D survey is acquired with a full range of azimuths, the variation in the derived transfer functions allows us to identify subsurface areas with high fracturing and determine the strike of those fractures. We calibrated the method with model data and then applied it to the Emilio field with a fractured reservoir giving results which agree with known field measurements and previously published fracture orientations derived from PS anisotropy. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship United States. Dept. of Energy (Grant number DE-FC26-02NT15346) en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Earth Resources Laboratory en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Eni S.p.A. (Firm) en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Earth Resources Laboratory en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Earth Resources Laboratory Industry Consortia Annual Report;2006-14
dc.title Spatial Orientation and Distribution of Reservoir Fractures from Scattered Seismic Energy en_US
dc.type Technical Report en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthor Willis, Mark E.
dc.contributor.mitauthor Burns, Daniel R.
dc.contributor.mitauthor Rao, Rama V. N.
dc.contributor.mitauthor Minsley, Burke J.
dc.contributor.mitauthor Toksoz, M. Nafi
dspace.orderedauthors Willis, Mark E.; Burns, Daniel R.; Rao, Rama V. N.; Minsley, Burke J.; Toksoz, M. Nafi; Vetri, Laura en_US


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