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DC to DC power conversion module for the all-electric ship

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dc.contributor.advisor Chrys Chryssostomidis and James L. Kirtley, Jr. en_US
dc.contributor.author Gray, Weston L en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-11T19:42:00Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-11T19:42:00Z
dc.date.copyright 2011 en_US
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/68166
dc.description Thesis (Nav. E.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2011. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 91-92). en_US
dc.description.abstract The MIT end to end electric ship model is being developed to study competing electric ship designs. This project produced a model of a Power Conversion Module (PCM)- 4, DC-to-DC converter which interfaces with the MIT model. The focus was on the Medium Voltage DC (MVDC) architecture, and therefore, the PCM-4 converts a MVDC bus voltage of 3.3, 6.5 or 10 kVDC to 1 kVDC. The design describes the transient and steady-state behavior, and investigates the naval architecture characteristics. A modular architecture, similar to SatCon Applied Technology's Modular Expandable Power Converters, was selected as the best balance for the wide variation in loads experienced. The model consists of a standard module that can be paralleled internally to provide for a wide range of system power requirements. Naval architecture parameters, such as weight, volume, efficiency, and heat load, were compiled into a parametric format allowing a reasonable approximation of actual weight and volume as a function of rating and efficiency and heat load as a function of loading. All of the parameters were evaluated for dependence on the MVDC bus voltage. Verification of the model was pursued through comparison to available simulations of similar power electronics to ensure that the model provided reasonable time response and shape. Finally, the model met all requirements with the exception of efficiency which was slightly lower than the requirement although several ideas were presented to improve efficiency. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Weston L. Gray. en_US
dc.format.extent 92, A1-A13 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.subject Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.title DC to DC power conversion module for the all-electric ship en_US
dc.title.alternative Direct current to direct current power conversion module for the all-electric ship en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.description.degree Nav.E. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 767584597 en_US


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