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dc.contributor.advisorKaren R. Sollins.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodrow, Stephen Roberten_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T20:16:55Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T20:16:55Z
dc.date.copyright2011en_US
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/68172
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M. in Technology and Policy)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, Technology and Policy Program; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2011.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 157-163).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis analyzes and discusses the effectiveness of social efforts to achieve collective action amongst Internet network operators in order to manage the growth of the Internet routing table. The size and rate of growth of the Internet routing table is an acknowledged challenge impeding the scalability of our BGP interdomain routing architecture. While most of the work towards a solution to this problem has focused on architectural improvements, an effort launched in the 1990s called the CIDR Report attempts to incentivize route aggregation using social forces and norms in the Internet operator community. This thesis analyzes the behavior of Internet network operators in response to the CIDR Report from 1997 to 2011 to determine whether the Report was effective in achieving this goal. While it is difficult to causally attribute aggregation behavior to appearance on the CIDR report, there is a trend for networks to improve their prefix aggregation following an appearance on the CIDR Report compared to untreated networks. This suggests that the CIDR Report did affect network aggregation behavior, although the routing table continued to grow. This aggregation improvement is most prevalent early in the study period and becomes less apparent as time goes on. Potential causes of the apparent change in efficacy of the Report are discussed and examined using Ostrom's Common Pool Resource framework. The thesis then concludes with a discussion of options for mitigating routing table growth, including the continued use of community forces to better manage the Internet routing table.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Stephen Robert Woodrow.en_US
dc.format.extent165 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleTragedy of the routing table : an analysis of collective action amongst Internet network operatorsen_US
dc.title.alternativeAnalysis of collective action amongst Internet network operatorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc769023689en_US


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