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Gender difference in daily activity patterns, urban form, and intra-household interactions

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dc.contributor.advisor Joseph Ferreira. en_US
dc.contributor.author Xue, Lulu en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-29T18:23:41Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-29T18:23:41Z
dc.date.copyright 2011 en_US
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/69527
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2011. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 98-103). en_US
dc.description One notable issue to deal with when capturing the individualism of travel behaviors is the gender difference. An extensive body of research has widely acknowledged that women and men exhibit quite different travel and activity patterns. For example, findings have suggested that women tend to invest more time to family-sustaining activities and that women make more family-sustaining trips yet fewer recreational trips. The primary focus of this study is to account for gender difference in travel behaviors. Particularly, the study attempts to understand how micro-level household dynamics and meso-level urban form may affect the activity patterns of women and men differently. To test the hypotheses and the prototype model, the city of Santiago de Chile is chosen. Although the empirical results from this study do not conclusively confirm that either household dynamics or urban from constitute solid reasons for the gender differences in activity patterns, increasing females' bargaining powers and improving accessibility still remain a viable approach to empower women in Santiago de Chile. Moreover, it is found that traditional travel demand models without incorporating the power relation are less responsive to the change in household dynamics between spouses and thus tend to underestimate the travel demand of a transitional society. This underestimation of travel demand would possibly affect the accessibility and mobility of the society adversely. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Lulu Xue. en_US
dc.format.extent 103 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.title Gender difference in daily activity patterns, urban form, and intra-household interactions en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 776159071 en_US


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