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Innovations to increase building capacity to accommodate changes over time

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dc.contributor.advisor E. Sarah Slaughter. en_US
dc.contributor.author Nelson, Gina R., 1977- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-13T18:51:48Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-13T18:51:48Z
dc.date.issued 2001 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/72797
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2001. en_US
dc.description "February 2001." en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 245-248). en_US
dc.description.abstract A framework is presented for the analysis and comparison of innovations that increase the capacity of buildings to accommodate changes over time. The framework is developed for the broad application to innovations in design and construction that increase facility flexibility. The framework is based on the analysis and comparison of a sample of innovations using a set of descriptive and quantitative variables. A sample of 50 innovations in design and construction for increased facility flexibility is identified through an in-depth literature review as well as interviews and site visits with industry professionals in the Boston area. The set of 6 descriptive and 27 measurable variables is selected because of the applicability of these variables to an analysis concerning the use of innovations to accommodate future changes in buildings. All of the innovations in the sample are characterized, categorized, and analyzed based on each of the variables. The results of this analysis are presented in the context of the benefits and costs of innovations for increased flexibility in buildings. The overall analysis of the entire innovation sample is performed at a general level of detail for the purpose of the development of a general framework. A smaller sample of innovations made up of 25 of the original 50 is analyzed in more detail using actual cost figures. This specific benefit cost analysis provides actual figures for the additional costs and savings associated with these innovations over time. The results for the detailed benefit cost analysis provide insight to the effects of innovations for increased building flexibility over the life cycle of a building at a more specific level. The framework developed in this research allows building designers, constructors, owners, and users to reduce the uncertainties associated with the use of innovations in building projects. This framework also provides considerable insight into the importance of facility flexibility over the life cycle of a building. Building professionals can effectively use this framework to understand the costs and savings associated with the ability to accommodate change in buildings over time and to analyze, compare, and select innovations to accomplish facility flexibility. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Gina R. Nelson. en_US
dc.format.extent 248 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title Innovations to increase building capacity to accommodate changes over time en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 48085597 en_US


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