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Information to iteration : using information and communication technologies [ICT] in design for remote regions

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dc.contributor.advisor George Stiny. en_US
dc.contributor.author Griffith, Kenfield A. (Kenfield Allistair) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial nwtr--- f-ke--- f-tz--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-13T18:53:52Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-13T18:53:52Z
dc.date.copyright 2012 en_US
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/72820
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D. in Design and Computation)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 2012. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 155-159 (i.e. [190]-[194])). en_US
dc.description.abstract Remote design comes with significant challenges. A major barrier to designing in remote regions is the lack of communication between designers and users. As a result, the lack of information flow leads to assumptions about the community's needs- an inherent weakness in the design process. This study examines the role that mobile phones play as a mode of communication between designers of products for communities in developing countries and the users within the communities themselves, in order to provide a better sense of context and environment. This study focused on the use of a communication software called mSurvey and its ability to create accessible feedback flows, that would otherwise be difficult to achieve within remote areas. The investigation uses three case studies as examples. These case studies differ in location, design team, and distance. The first case study took place in Trinidad and Tobago and had software engineers as the design team. The second case study, in Nairobi, Kenya, consisted of architects, engineers, and Masters of Business Administration (MBAs) as the design team. The third case study, in Tanzania, consisted of a company of over 160 employees, whose job titles ranged from designers and engineers, to supply chain strategists. The findings illustrate that, although each design task was different, there are similar challenges when designing for remote regions, specifically, developing countries. The solution to some of these challenges is the increased use of mobile technologies between designers and communities. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Kenfield Allistair Griffith. en_US
dc.format.extent 159 (i.e. [194]) p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Architecture. en_US
dc.title Information to iteration : using information and communication technologies [ICT] in design for remote regions en_US
dc.title.alternative Using information and communication technologies [ICT] in design for remote regions en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D.in Design and Computation en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 806474212 en_US


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