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Assessment of the appropriateness and market opportunity of a point-of-care diagnostic solution for hepatitis C in the United States

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dc.contributor.advisor Ernst R. Berndt and William Rodriguez. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rocker, Charlotte (Charlotte Amanda Lucy) en_US
dc.contributor.other Harvard--MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial n-us--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-13T19:37:27Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-13T19:37:27Z
dc.date.copyright 2012 en_US
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/72942
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Harvard-MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology, 2012. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 60-64). en_US
dc.description.abstract Hepatitis C (HCV) is the most common bloodborne infection in the United States. Although the incidence of HCV is declining, the burden of the disease is rising, driven by the increasing rates of end-stage liver disease and other consequences of advanced HCV infection. According to a 2009 report, the number of patients with advanced liver disease will quadruple over the next 20 years; in that time, total medical costs for patients with HCV infection are expected nearly to triple, from $30 billion to more than $85 billion. Given the limitations of current treatments and diagnostic technologies, HCV often goes undiagnosed and/or untreated. With new therapies in the pipeline that offer the promise of increased efficacy and improved side effect profiles, there likely will be a demand for improved diagnostics to more quickly and accurately identify patients in need of treatment. Daktari Diagnostics, Inc., based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is developing a point-of-care, microfluidic diagnostic system that could be used both to diagnose HCV patients and to monitor treatment response. This thesis hypothesizes that Daktari's HCV diagnostic system can generate revenue in the United States, given the dynamics of the market. To explore this hypothesis, a background on the current diagnostic and treatment standards in HCV is presented, followed by an analysis of diagnostics and treatments currently in development. The thesis then defines the current paradigm of HCV testing and treatment and explores one potential future paradigm. Finally, a model of the HCV diagnostic market from 2012- 2019 is generated. This model demonstrates that, under conservative assumptions, the Daktari diagnostic system could generate a minimum of $25MM in revenue in the United States over its first five years on the market, from 2015-2019. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Charlotte Rocker. en_US
dc.format.extent 64 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Harvard--MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.title Assessment of the appropriateness and market opportunity of a point-of-care diagnostic solution for hepatitis C in the United States en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Harvard--MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 809089545 en_US


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