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Three-dimensional virus scaffolds for energy storage and microdevice applications

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dc.contributor.advisor Angela M. Belcher. en_US
dc.contributor.author Burpo, F. John (Fred John) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biological Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-10T15:44:16Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-10T15:44:16Z
dc.date.copyright 2011 en_US
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/73776
dc.description Thesis (Sc. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Biological Engineering, February 2012. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description.abstract With constantly increasing demand for lightweight power sources, electrode architectures that eliminate the need for conductive and organic additives will increase mass specific energy and power densities. The increased demand for lightweight power is coupled with increasing device miniaturization. As the scale of devices decreases, current battery technologies add mass on the same scale as the device itself. A dual functional electro-mechanical material that serves as both the device structural material and the power source would dramatically improve device integration and range for powered movement. To address the demand for lightweight power with the objective of a dual functional electro-mechanical material, the M 13 bacteriophage was used to create novel 3-dimensional nano-architectures. To synthesize 3-dimensional nanowire scaffolds, the M13 virus is covalently linked into a hydrogel that serves as a 3-dimensional bio-template for the mineralization of copper and nickel nanowires. Control of nanowire diameter, scaffold porosity, and film thickness is demonstrated. The nanowire scaffolds are found to be highly conductive and can be synthesized as free-standing films. To demonstrate the viability of the 3-dimensional nanowire networks for electrical energy storage, copper nanowires were galvanically displaced to a mixed phase copper-tin system. These tin based anodes were used for lithium rechargeable batteries and demonstrated a high storage capacity per square area and stable cycling approaching 100 cycles. To determine the viability of the 3-dimensional nanowire networks as dual functional electro-mechanical materials and the mechanical stability of processing intermediates, phage hydrogels, aerogels, and metal nanowire networks were examined with nano-indentation. The elastic moduli of the metal networks are in the range of open cell metal foams The demonstration of 3-dimensional virus-templated metal nanowire networks as electrically conductive and mechanically robust should facilitate their implementation across a broad array of device applications to include photovoltaics, catalysis, electrochromics, and fuel cells. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by F. John Burpo. en_US
dc.format.extent 156 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Biological Engineering. en_US
dc.title Three-dimensional virus scaffolds for energy storage and microdevice applications en_US
dc.title.alternative 3-dimensional virus scaffolds for energy storage and microdevice applications en_US
dc.title.alternative 3D virus scaffolds for energy storage and microdevice applications en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Sc.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Biological Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 810144403 en_US


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