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Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo

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dc.contributor.advisor Balakrishnan Rajagopal. en_US
dc.contributor.author Gray, Ian P en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial f-cg--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-10T15:48:03Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-10T15:48:03Z
dc.date.copyright 2012 en_US
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/73814
dc.description Thesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2012. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 78-83). en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The development of administrative mechanisms to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD) become a cultural script through which the institutions of the World Bank and the United Nations Development Program "prepare" the post-colonial state to be a rational producer of avoided forest carbon emissions. The two actions-building the state and stabilizing a commodifiable carbon-occur unconsciously as a process Sheila Jasanoff calls "co-production," a dialectic in which efforts to change the natural order depend on unquestioned ideas about the social order, and visa versa. As this thesis shows, instrumental goals of making carbon governable in a country bearing the heavy legacy of Belgian colonialism and the scars of the largest regional war in recent African history, run a high risk of reproducing embedded inequities found at the local level. The impacts of global climate change are expected to have especially adverse affects on subsistence communities dependent on forest resources for their daily existence. If REDD architecture would live up to its stated goal of also improving livelihoods in the non-Annex I countries of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, it must engage in a more overtly "coproductionist" politics of carbon management. This means developing overt mechanisms that provide more continuous interactions between different epistemic communities in the domestic REDD countries (international experts, national administrators and local communities), linking local level institutions upward with higher scales of administration in setting the rules for carbon management, as well as strengthening community control of resources so that the decision to participate in the provisioning of global public goods can be made with more autonomy. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Ian P. Gray. en_US
dc.format.extent 83 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.title Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.C.P. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 811255452 en_US


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