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Will Economic Restructuring in China Reduce Trade-Embodied CO2 Emissions?

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dc.contributor.author Qi, Tianyu
dc.contributor.author Winchester, Niven
dc.contributor.author Karplus, Valerie J.
dc.contributor.author Zhang, Xiliang
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-11T20:21:55Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-11T20:21:55Z
dc.date.issued 2012-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/73903
dc.description.abstract We calculate CO2 emissions embodied in China’s net exports using a multi-regional input-output database. We find that the majority of China’s export-embodied CO2 is associated with production of machinery and equipment rather than energy-intensive products, such as steel and aluminum. In 2007, the largest net recipients of embodied CO2 emissions from China include the EU (360 million metric tons, mmt), the U.S. (337 mmt), and Japan (109 mmt). Overall, annual CO2 emissions embodied in China’s net exports totaled 1,177 mmt, equal to 22% of China’s total CO2 emissions. We also develop a global general equilibrium model with a detailed treatment of energy and CO2 emissions. We use the model to analyze the impact of a sectoral shift in the Chinese economy away from industry and towards services, both without and with a decrease in China’s trade surplus, and a tax on energy-intensive exports, which reflect policy objectives in China’s Twelfth Five-Year Plan (2011–2015). We find that without a decrease in the trade surplus, both policies will have a limited impact on China’s net exports of embodied CO2 emissions. The policies have an even smaller effect on global emissions, as reduced production in China is partially offset by increased production elsewhere. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship We acknowledge the support of the National Social Science Foundation of China (Project No. Project No. 09&ZD029) and the Institute for Energy, Environment, and Economy at Tsinghua University, which is supporting Tianyu Qi’s doctoral research as a visiting scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. We further acknowledge the support of Eni S.p.A., ICF International, and Shell International Ltd., initial sponsors of the China Energy and Climate Project in the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at MIT. None of the sponsoring organizations played a role in the study design, collection, analysis, or interpretation of the data used for this study, nor did they influence our decisions to submit the article for publication, and all errors are our own. We also acknowledge general industrial and government sponsors of the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change (http://globalchange.mit.edu/sponsors/all). en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries JP Report;232
dc.rights An error occurred on the license name. en
dc.rights.uri An error occurred getting the license - uri. en
dc.title Will Economic Restructuring in China Reduce Trade-Embodied CO2 Emissions? en_US
dc.type Technical Report en_US
dc.identifier.citation Report 232 en_US


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