Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAnne Whiston Spirn.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReyes, Ulisesen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-16T16:32:14Z
dc.date.available2015-12-16T16:32:14Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/100324
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Arch., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 85).en_US
dc.description.abstractPeople in cities in select parts of the world are on the cusp of a paradigm never before experienced by previous generations. The demographic-economic paradox tells us there is an inverse correlation found between wealth and fertility within nations. In other words, the higher the degree of education and GDP per capita of a human population, the fewer children born in any industrialized country. This phenomenon can be seen in Europe, where a decrease in fertility and mortality rates have resulted in people of ages 65 and older to comprise at least 15% of the population in over half of its countries with the potential of it rising to 35% in 2050. The aging of Japan is thought to outweigh all other nations, as the country is purported to have the highest proportion of elderly citizens, with almost one in four over the age of 65. Interesting phenomena have resulted from this situation, such as the sales of adult diapers outpacing the sales of infant diapers, and, as of 2005, its death rate outpacing its birth rate. While many living options are available to elderly populations, many of them are becoming financially out of reach for new generations of seniors. Popular in Europe, co-housing opens up new alternatives for seniors to, to live as independently as possible, as long as possible. Co-housing sets seniors up for success and helps them achieve their full potential in the last 20-30 years of life. Co-housing living arrangements support individual's well-being physically, socially, and emotionally, and offers aging adults a way to live among people with whom they share a common bond of age and experience-an entirely new way to house themselves with dignity, independence, safety, mutual concern, and fun. Looking at various neighborhoods in Boston as potential zones of concentration of elderly populations, this thesis aims to develop a new, scalable, co-housing typology that can be applied to cities with similar challenges.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Ulises Reyes.en_US
dc.format.extent85 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleNew norc city/en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Arch.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc930603763en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record