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dc.contributor.advisorEvelyn N. Wang.en_US
dc.contributor.authorQueeney, John (John Keeler)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-15T21:10:59Z
dc.date.available2016-01-15T21:10:59Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/100886
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 28).en_US
dc.description.abstractCar air conditioning systems cool the entire cabin, which is inefficient, as only the air surrounding the passengers needs to be cooled to realize a similar effect. These air conditioning units draw large amounts of power, enough to be detrimental to fuel efficiency. This presents problems for cars with smaller engines and electric cars that lack the battery capacity to provide adequate cooling with traditional air conditioning technology. A novel solution to these problems uses evaporative cooling via jumping droplet condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces to provide localized cooling with 100 times less power input. Jumping droplet condensation takes place when microscale droplets coalesce on superhydrophobic surfaces and excess surface energy is converted to kinetic energy, resulting in droplets that jump perpendicularly off the surface. As these droplets fall through the air, they evaporate, cooling the surrounding air and providing localized cooling. To test this technology, a prototype device was designed, fabricated, and tested at different relative humidities in an environmental chamber. Cooling of up to 4.8°C relative to ambient was achieved at 80% relative humidity, 4 cm from the condensing surface. This result suggests an optimal humidity for the operation of these devices and prompts further lines of study for the optimization of this technology.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby John Queeney.en_US
dc.format.extent38 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleEvaporative cooling via jumping droplet condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces for localized car air conditioningen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc933610023en_US


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