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dc.contributor.authorTao, Ye, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Chemistry.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T20:29:38Z
dc.date.available2016-03-03T20:29:38Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/101455
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 257-285).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is devoted to a systematic development of methods for controlling energy dissipation in small mechanical systems, specifically nanomechanical resonators with at least one dimension in the deep nanometer range (< 200 nm). We explored three avenues for decreasing intrinsic dissipation and one method for decreasing non-contact friction. The three routes toward lower intrinsic dissipation are surface chemical engineering, alternative materials testing, and geometric optimization through nanofabrication. Reduction in non-contact friction between a vibrating nanomechanical resonator and a surface, spaced nanometers away from the latter, was achieved by using a diamond nanowire as an integrated scanning tip. Each of the four approaches led to between one and two orders of magnitude reduction in dissipation compared to the previous state-of-the-art in the literature. Planned integration of individual successful approaches is expected to result in devices with sufficient force sensitivity and with the suitable geometry for the nanomechanical detection of a single nuclear spin by magnetic resonance force microscopy.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Ye Tao.en_US
dc.format.extent285 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectChemistry.en_US
dc.titleNanomechanical systems with small dissipationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Chemistry.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc940566272en_US


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