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dc.contributor.advisorKay M. Tye.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNieh, Edward H. (Edward Horng-An)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-12T18:33:35Z
dc.date.available2017-01-12T18:33:35Z
dc.date.copyright2016en_US
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/106440
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D. in Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 2016.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 209-231).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe lateral hypothalamus and ventral tegmental area are two brain regions that have long been known to be involved in processing reward and the control of feeding behaviors. We continue work in this area by identifying the functional connectivity between these two regions, providing evidence that LH neurons projecting to the VTA encode conditioned responses, while LH neurons innervated by the VTA encode conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Activation of the LH-VTA projection can increase compulsive sugar seeking, while inhibition of the projection can suppress this behavior without altering normal feeding due to hunger. We can separate this projection into the GABAergic and glutamatergic components, and we show that the GABAergic component plays a role in promoting feeding and social interaction by increasing motivation for consummatory behaviors, while the glutamatergic component largely plays a role in the suppression of these behaviors. Finally, we show that activation of the GABAergic component causes dopamine release downstream in the nucleus accumbens via disinhibition of VTA dopamine neurons through VTA GABA neurons. Together, these experiments have profoundly elucidated the functional roles of the individual circuit components of the greater mesolimbic dopamine system and provided potential targets for therapeutic intervention of overeating disorders and obesity..en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Edward H. Nieh.en_US
dc.format.extent231 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectBrain and Cognitive Sciences.en_US
dc.titleLateral hypothalamic control of motivated behaviors through the midbrain dopamine systemen_US
dc.title.alternativeLH control of motivated behaviors through the midbrain dopamine systemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D. in Neuroscienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc967344162en_US


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