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Evolution in the Cornbelt : how a few special species are adapting to industrial agriculture

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dc.contributor.advisor Marcia Bartusiak. en_US
dc.contributor.author Gearin, Conor J. (Conor James) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-30T19:16:32Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-30T19:16:32Z
dc.date.issued 2016 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/106747
dc.description Thesis: S.M. in Science Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Humanities, Graduate Program in Science Writing, September 2016. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. "June 2016." en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 29-32). en_US
dc.description.abstract Over the last 150 years, humans have wrought sweeping changes to the Great Plains. What was once the prairie is now the Corn Belt-row crops planted from fencerow to fencerow. What does this mean for the native wildlife, which evolved for millions of years to live only on the prairie? Here are the stories of three species-cliff swallows, western corn rootworms, and prairie deer mice-that natural selection has reshaped to thrive in the new agricultural landscape. With his finches, Charles Darwin read the record of evolution in the past. In the Corn Belt, today's scientists can see evolution in real time. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Conor J. Gearin. en_US
dc.format.extent 32 pages en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights MIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.title Evolution in the Cornbelt : how a few special species are adapting to industrial agriculture en_US
dc.title.alternative Evolution in the Corn Belt en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. in Science Writing en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 969441534 en_US


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