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dc.contributor.advisorA. John Hart.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yue, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T19:17:58Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T19:17:58Z
dc.date.copyright2016en_US
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/106781
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2016.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 121-129).en_US
dc.description.abstractElectrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing can be used to fabricate high resolution (~100 nm) features at high rates (~10 kHz), and is compatible with a wide range of materials. However, conventional EHD printing techniques focus only on homogeneously dispersed functional inks, including nanoparticulate materials, molecular and polymers. This thesis explores EHD printing of liquids containing microparticles. For printing, liquids containing microparticles with a diameter of ~1-10 pm are prepared, which sediment upon loading into the capillary tip. A single-tip EHD apparatus enabling pulsed delivery of kilovolt signals, high speed imaging, and measurement of charge transfer to the substrate has been constructed. Using this apparatus, it is shown that pulsed voltage signals can cause printing of liquid droplets, streams, and aggregates containing microparticles, at rates of ~10 kHz. Upon evaporation of the liquid, the particles organize into clusters that, depending on the deposition conditions, may form continuous lines or regularly spaced aggregates. By first-order modeling of the forces exerted on the particles, it is concluded that the amount of colloidal material ejected from the capillary is influenced by the packing of the particles within the meniscus, their size, the strength of electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions, and other factors. Future work should focus on the design of the colloidal solution and EHD parameters to enable controlled and consistent ejection of particles, and improvement of the accuracy of deposition. This process therefore is attractive for additive manufacturing of composite materials by direct deposition of microparticles.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Yue Guan.en_US
dc.format.extent129 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleElectrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing of microparticle streams for additive manufacturingen_US
dc.title.alternativeElectrohydrodynamic printing of microparticle streams for additive manufacturingen_US
dc.title.alternativeEHD printing of microparticle streams for additive manufacturingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc970344764en_US


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