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dc.contributor.authorGlantz, Spencer T.
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Eric J.
dc.contributor.authorMelkonian, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Kevin H.
dc.contributor.authorWong, Gane Ka-Shu
dc.contributor.authorChow, Brian Y.
dc.contributor.authorBoyden, Edward
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-02T16:22:00Z
dc.date.available2017-02-02T16:22:00Z
dc.date.issued2016-02
dc.date.submitted2015-05
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/106825
dc.description.abstractLight–oxygen–voltage sensitive (LOV) flavoproteins are ubiquitous photoreceptors that mediate responses to environmental cues. Photosensory inputs are transduced into signaling outputs via structural rearrangements in sensor domains that consequently modulate the activity of an effector domain or multidomain clusters. Establishing the diversity in effector function and sensor–effector topology will inform what signaling mechanisms govern light-responsive behaviors across multiple kingdoms of life and how these signals are transduced. Here, we report the bioinformatics identification of over 6,700 candidate LOV domains (including over 4,000 previously unidentified sequences from plants and protists), and insights from their annotations for ontological function and structural arrangements. Motif analysis identified the sensors from ∼42 million ORFs, with strong statistical separation from other flavoproteins and non-LOV members of the structurally related Per-aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-Sim family. Conserved-domain analysis determined putative light-regulated function and multidomain topologies. We found that for certain effectors, sensor–effector linker length is discretized based on both phylogeny and the preservation of α-helical heptad repeats within an extended coiled-coil linker structure. This finding suggests that preserving sensor–effector orientation is a key determinant of linker length, in addition to ancestry, in LOV signaling structure–function. We found a surprisingly high prevalence of effectors with functions previously thought to be rare among LOV proteins, such as regulators of G protein signaling, and discovered several previously unidentified effectors, such as lipases. This work highlights the value of applying genomic and transcriptomic technologies to diverse organisms to capture the structural and functional variation in photosensory proteins that are vastly important in adaptation, photobiology, and optogenetics.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUnited States. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Living Foundries Program (Grant HR0011-12-C-0068)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Media Laboratory.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHarvard-MIT Joint Research Grants Program in Basic Neuroscienceen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOffice of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineeringen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (U.S.) (Grants CBET 1053233 and EFRI 0835878)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (U.S.) (Grants 1DP2OD002002, 1R01NS067199, 1R01DA029639, 1R01GM104948, 1RC1MH088182, and 1R01NS075421)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWallace H. Coulter Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAlfred P. Sloan Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHuman Frontier Science Program (Strasbourg, France)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNew York Stem Cell Foundation (Robertson Neuroscience Investigator Award)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipInstitution of Engineering and Technology (A. F. Harvey Prize)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSkolkovo Institute of Science and Technologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences (U.S.)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1509428113en_US
dc.rightsArticle is made available in accordance with the publisher's policy and may be subject to US copyright law. Please refer to the publisher's site for terms of use.en_US
dc.sourcePNASen_US
dc.titleFunctional and topological diversity of LOV domain photoreceptorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.citationGlantz, Spencer T. et al. “Functional and Topological Diversity of LOV Domain Photoreceptors.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113.11 (2016): E1442–E1451. © 2016 National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Biological Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Media Laboratoryen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMcGovern Institute for Brain Research at MITen_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Media Arts and Sciences (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)en_US
dc.contributor.mitauthorBoyden, Edward
dc.relation.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.type.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/type/JournalArticleen_US
eprint.statushttp://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerRevieweden_US
dspace.orderedauthorsGlantz, Spencer T.; Carpenter, Eric J.; Melkonian, Michael; Gardner, Kevin H.; Boyden, Edward S.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Chow, Brian Y.en_US
dspace.embargo.termsNen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-0419-3351
mit.licensePUBLISHER_POLICYen_US


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