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dc.contributor.advisorDina Katabi.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAdib, Fadelen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T19:09:32Z
dc.date.available2017-05-11T19:09:32Z
dc.date.copyright2016en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/108852
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, February 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 155-166).en_US
dc.description.abstractWireless signals, such as Wi-Fi, are traditionally used for communications. In this thesis, we show that these signals can also be used as sensing tools that enable us to learn about our environment without physically reaching out to the various objects in it. Specifically, as these signals travel in the medium, they traverse occlusions like walls and bounce off different objects and humans before arriving at a receiver; hence, they carry information about the environment. This thesis presents algorithms and software-hardware systems that extract this information to deliver a variety of new sensing capabilities. We deliver four fundamental contributions: We present the first design that uses Wi-Fi signals to see through walls, enabling us to detect people behind walls by relying purely on the reflections of Wi-Fi signals off their bodies. Next, we demonstrate how we can use radio frequency (RF) reflections to track people's 3D locations and gestures in indoor environments without requiring them to wear or carry any devices. Beyond localizing people, we introduce the first system that can recover human silhouettes through walls; the captured silhouettes enable us to track the 3D positions of human limbs and body parts and to distinguish between different people behind a wall. Finally, we show how smart environments can monitor their inhabitants breathing and heart rates by relying purely on how the human body modulates reflected RF signals. To deliver these contributions, we exploit physical properties of RF signals, work across software-hardware boundaries, and introduce new systems and new algorithms that require redesigning the entire computing stack, from the hardware to the applications. We implement and evaluate these systems demonstrating how they can enable many new real-world applications including baby monitoring, elderly fall detection, non-invasive vital sign tracking, gesture control, and human identification through walls..en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Fadel Adib.en_US
dc.format.extentxxix, 166 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleWireless systems that extend our sensesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc986522009en_US


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