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dc.contributor.advisorKarl K. Berggren.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBellei, Francescoen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T20:00:23Z
dc.date.available2017-05-11T20:00:23Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/109008
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 113-120).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe ever-increasing data sharing demands of modern technologies forces scientists to adopt new methods that can surpass the approaching limits of classical physics. Quantum optical communications and information, based on single-photon detectors offer the most promising possibility to reach new levels of data rate and communication security. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have already been used in the past to demonstrate new protocols of quantum key distribution and are currently the best single-photon detection technology to enable quantum optical communication. With the goal of creating a global quantum communication network, both optical fiber and free-space optical communication technologies have been explored. In addition, the scientific community started pursuing smaller and cheaper cryogenic solutions to enable the use of SNSPDs on a large scale. In this thesis, I describe the design and development of a cryogenic SNSPD receivers in free-space and optical-fiber configurations for 1550-nm-wavelength. The first configuration was created with the goal of enabling optical communication in the mid-IR. I present future steps to achieve this goal. The second configuration was designed to enable a compact and scalable integration of multiple SNSPD channels in the same system. Our approach has the potential of enabling SNSPD systems with more than 64 channels.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Francesco Bellei.en_US
dc.format.extent120 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleSuperconducting nanowire single photon detectors for infrared communicationsen_US
dc.title.alternativeSNSPDs for infrared communicationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc986529333en_US


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