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dc.contributor.advisorAna Miljacki.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Kainingen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.coverage.spatiala-cc-peen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T20:00:55Z
dc.date.available2017-05-11T20:00:55Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/109018
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Arch., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionPage 99 blank. Cataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 97-98).en_US
dc.description.abstract"If the Warsaw community is to be reborn, if its core is to be constituted by former Warsawians, then they have to be given back, their old rebuilt Warsaw to some extent, so that they can see in it the same city, though considerably altered, and not a different town on the same spot. One must take into consideration the fact that individual attachment to old forms is a factor of social unity." --A writer's Comments Warsaw's post WWII reconstruction project for The Warsaw Escarpment, 1946 The notion of "Wall" is intrinsic to how Chinese people understand and define a city; in fact, the very character "City" in an ancient Chinese pictogram depicts a wall with two gates preventing an attacker from invading. The People's Republic of China came into power with an overwhelming sentiment of restart and revolution following the trauma of World War II and the Chinese Civil War. In the early period of modern China, the critical relics of the wall were quickly dismissed in favor of expansion and modernization. It was dismantled under Mao Zedong's regime in only a decade. The sentiment to resurrect the wall has long been present; people wish for its resurrection in part because many places in Beijing are still named accordingly. It is apparent that the wall and its gates are still instrumental to the local inhabitants' psycho-geographic maps. However, the few reconstruction projects that were actually realized by the government have not only disrupted the life of current inhabitants, but also done more harm to the surviving courtyard house fabric than good. Therefore, this project proposes an alternative method of reconstruction which enriches, rather than damages, the old city center. The new wall is imagined as a continuous landscape infrastructure; the design systematically investigates the original footprint and existing context. A set of interventions, ranging from constructions of new wall structures to minimal marking of the original footprint, aim to actualize a much-missed coherency in a fragmented reality.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Kaining Peng.en_US
dc.format.extent99 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titlePeople's Wall : reconstructing a new city wall for the modern city of Beijingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Arch.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc986529684en_US


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