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dc.contributor.advisorAbel Sanchez.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRamirez, Robert B. (Robert Butler)en_US
dc.contributor.otherTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-15T14:20:27Z
dc.date.available2017-09-15T14:20:27Z
dc.date.copyright2017en_US
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/111232
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Technology and Policy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Institute for Data, Systems, and Society, Technology and Policy Program, 2017.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 88-97).en_US
dc.description.abstractCyber security was historically a technical subfield of computer science. However, pervasive computing technology has recently made security a significant concern for management and policy. In this thesis, I review the academic literature of cyber security, and argue that security as a field comprises four different subdisciplines: policy, computer science, management, and social science. Furthermore, collaboration and communication between these fields is lacking, as evidenced by differing terminology between these fields and few interdisciplinary journal publications. The remainder of this thesis is devoted to answering the question "How can cyber security professionals, including academic researchers, better approach cyber security as an interdisciplinary field; and what are the benefits of doing so?" This thesis recommends two steps the cyber security community can take towards becoming more interdisciplinary: undergraduate multi-departmental education; and harmonizing terminology between subdisciplines. To the first step, I present a novel curriculum design: an interdisciplinary minor in cyber security, which would equip non-security professionals with basic knowledge of security, and equip security professionals with skills for approaching security with an interdisciplinary mindset. I create a balanced curriculum design based on the findings from my literature review regarding the four subdisciplines of security. MIT's entire subject catalog was sourced for classes, to design a model curriculum. While this curriculum proposal was developed for MIT, the design is institution-agnostic, and I discuss how to apply it to other universities. Second, to facilitate cross-disciplinary communication, I recommend instituting change at the higher, professional level. To achieve this, I recommend authors harmonize their jargon usage. This change would improve idea flow between authors from different disciplines, who work towards potentially mutually beneficial solutions, but who write for separate audiences in their publications. To identify areas in need of harmonization, I first examine the extent of differences in keyword usage in articles from each the four security subdisciplines. I also analyze time-series trends of terminology usage in cyber security journal articles, and I develop a methodology for authors or standards bodies to use when deciding whether a word or phrase is appropriately interdisciplinary, or has been accepted by the general cyber security community.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Robert B. Ramirez.en_US
dc.format.extent97 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectInstitute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.titleMaking cyber security interdisciplinary : recommendations for a novel curriculum and terminology harmonizationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentTechnology and Policy Program.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Institute for Data, Systems, and Society
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program
dc.identifier.oclc1003284196en_US


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